Participatory Budgeting: tough questions and real answers

May 21, 2013

tobyblume

I recently attended a discussion hosted by Lambeth Council’s Leader, Cllr Lib Peck, when council officers and councillors met with Josh Lerner, Executive Director of the North American Participatory Budgeting Project, Alderman Joe Moore from Chicago and Jez Hall from the UK PB Network. During the discussion a number of important questions were asked that felt pretty important to address if we are to adopt PB in UK on a meaningful scale. I thought it would be useful to others who are interested in PB, to share the questions, and the answers that were offered in response. The answers are based primarily on Alderman Moore’s experience of using PB in his Chicago Ward over the past 4 years, the PB Project’s work in New York, Toronto and San Fransisco and other North American cities. However I have also drawn on Jez Hall’s experience of PB in the UK and…

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Steps along the same path – Participatory Budgeting and Cooperative Council

May 7, 2013

tobyblume

Lambeth recently hosted the visit of two Participatory Budgeting experts from the US, as part of a study tour organised by Church Action on Poverty, as the culmination of their People’s Budget campaign. Josh Lerner, from the North American PB Project and Alderman Joe Moore, from Chicago met with elected members and senior officers at a roundtable event hosted by Leader Cllr. Lib Peck. 

The event provided an opportunity to hear first hand how PB is developing in the US and Canada and how it related to Lambeth’s ambitions to become a cooperative council. What I found particularly fascinating was to hear from an elected representative about their experience of ‘handing over power’ to citizens to determine how funding should be allocated to support local activity. The concept of citizens having far greater power in decision making is central to the vision of Coop Council and, like PB, is based…

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The Work Shop – from pop up council to coop council

December 3, 2012

Lambeth has set out its stall to become a cooperative council by 2014 and to transform the way it works in order to achieve this. One of the most important distinguishing features of this vision is to establish a fundamentally different relationship between citizens and the local authority – one based on collaboration, reciprocity and cooperation.

Changing things is tough, anyone working in large organisations or in the business of social change knows this all too well….of course it’s possible, but it can be a slog. One of things that helps creative thinking is to disrupt normal patterns of behaviour or thinking – causing us to question ‘normal’ ways of working and shakes us out of our pre-conceptions about business as usual.

We started to think about how we could begin to disrupt our normal approach to engaging residents in discussions, to develop a different, more ‘cooperative’, conversation.

The result is the Work Shop.The Work Shop window

Lambeth Council has taken a short term let on a vacant shop on West Norwood High Street to set up the Work Shop. Over the next few weeks we will be trying to reach out to the people who live, work and visit the area and inviting them to join us for a cup of tea, a conversation and more as we explore the possibilities to work better together.

Three days a week – including some evenings and weekends, so as many people as possible are able to pop in – we will be running a programme of talks, hosted conversations and workshops on a wide range of topics. Some will be led by council officers, some by public sector partners and others by local voluntary and community groups. You can find out more about what’s going on here. But in addition to these more ‘formal’ elements, there will be plenty of more informal opportunities to engage.

We don’t expect everyone to want to come to a workshop, at least not at first….the Work Shop has installations of things going on in the area, inspirational examples of what can be achieved through collaboration, and space to capture people’s ideas of how things might be changed for the better. We’ll also be doing some asset mapping – gathering community perspectives on the services, buildings, people, talents, ambitions and passions that the local community has and values. This will be crucial in helping to inform what happens in the future and is part of a much wider shift in how Lambeth, as a Cooperative Council, views its citizens and communities.the work shop

A shop on the high street in one part of the borough for a few weeks is not, by any stretch of the imagination, a panacea for the myriad challenges we need to overcome in order to realise the vision of the Cooperative Council. Rather, it is an experiment in the art of the possible…an attempt to test out a new way of working with citizens, which we can learn from and apply to other parts of the organisation in the future.

We are not content to sit in the Town Hall and pump out laudable policy documents about how things will be different in the future. The Work Shop takes the conversation out into the community, changes the rules of engagement and, we hope, provides an opportunity for a more creative and meaningful conversation about what the Cooperative Council could be.

If you’re in the area, pop in for a cup of tea and a chat. If not, then we’ll be posting regular updates as we go along.


Social Value and the Public Services (social value) Act

July 24, 2012

New legislation now requires local authorities and other public bodies to consider the social and environmental impact of contracts. This means taking account of a wider set of factors than simply price.

To do this it will be necessary to measure the potential social and environmental benefits or costs of a particular provider or approach.

Social Enterprise UK have produced a brief guide to the new legislation – the Public Services (Social Value) Act 2012 – to explain what the Act means and its likely implications for procurement and commissioning.

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Clubbing Together: The Hidden Wealth of Communities

July 16, 2012

A new report from Think Tank Respublica explores how membership of social clubs and leisure activities can contribute to social and public good.

Clubbing Together: The Hidden Wealth of Communities includes case studies which demonstrate that the contagious attitudes of engagement found in clubs can not only generate hidden wealth, but also create ‘spin-offs’ of social value: benefits which spill over into the wider community, when social goods become springboards for public good.


Examples of innovation and co-production

April 25, 2012

The Governance International website has a number of interesting good practice case studies, toolkits and other resources on effective co-production.

The case studies highlight how organisations can achieve better outcomes for citizens which cost less through co-production, including one on Lambeth’s Peer Educators


New web resources for self builders

April 23, 2012

A new website has been launched by the Department for Communities and Local Government (DCLG) to provide advice and support to people that are interested in building their own homes.

The Self Build Portal includes information on a range of topics you’ll need to know to build your own home such as:

  • Finding a plot
  • Different building techniques
  • Working with developers/house builders
  • Finance